Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing http://www.volvooceanraceabudhabi.com/blog/ Volvo Ocean Race en-us Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing Wed, 30 May 2012 10:48:49 GMT newtelligence dasBlog 2.1.8102.813 adil.elmouden@thetribe.com adil.elmouden@thetribe.com http://www.volvooceanraceabudhabi.com/blog/Trackback.aspx?guid=7ab54da2-55fd-429c-9114-43503a060645 http://www.volvooceanraceabudhabi.com/blog/pingback.aspx http://www.volvooceanraceabudhabi.com/blog/PermaLink,guid,7ab54da2-55fd-429c-9114-43503a060645.aspx ADOR http://www.volvooceanraceabudhabi.com/blog/CommentView,guid,7ab54da2-55fd-429c-9114-43503a060645.aspx http://www.volvooceanraceabudhabi.com/blog/SyndicationService.asmx/GetEntryCommentsRss?guid=7ab54da2-55fd-429c-9114-43503a060645

The barometer is climbing fast and steadily as we sail out of the frontal line that has given us speed for the past three days. From here, the breeze will moderate along with the sea state and we will begin to feel the effects of the high-pressure ridge in about 200 miles time. Forecasts are showing that the ridge could produce at least 12+ hours off near drifting conditions until we are able to pop through the other side into the northerlies. I imagine this will be a mind-bending experience as we either watch our lead extend or slip away.

In the last hour the breeze has dropped and headed slightly. During the watch change we peeled from the G1 to the fractional zero and are now sailing a slightly lower and faster course. The latest scheds are still showing that the boats furthest back are making the bigger gains on us, which really only proves how fast we are sailing out of this front. Fortunately, we have managed to keep the angry kitty (Puma) at bay and still hold a small buffer zone of 30+ miles.

The fire in team morale still burns strong. Jules and Ian have been non-stop with performance analysis and weather updates. Since we are being chased by what feels like a pack of dogs (and one cat), the general theme has been to sail the fastest angle possible. So the boys have been really pushing Azzam for the 36 hours. Hopefully it will have been enough to give us an advantage when we hit the ridge off Portugal.

Team Blog – Nick Dana– 30th May 2012 http://www.volvooceanraceabudhabi.com/blog/PermaLink,guid,7ab54da2-55fd-429c-9114-43503a060645.aspx http://www.volvooceanraceabudhabi.com/blog/2012/05/30/TeamBlogNickDana30thMay2012.aspx Wed, 30 May 2012 10:48:49 GMT <p> The barometer is climbing fast and steadily as we sail out of the frontal line that has given us speed for the past three days. From here, the breeze will moderate along with the sea state and we will begin to feel the effects of the high-pressure ridge in about 200 miles time. Forecasts are showing that the ridge could produce at least 12+ hours off near drifting conditions until we are able to pop through the other side into the northerlies. I imagine this will be a mind-bending experience as we either watch our lead extend or slip away. </p> <p> In the last hour the breeze has dropped and headed slightly. During the watch change we peeled from the G1 to the fractional zero and are now sailing a slightly lower and faster course. The latest scheds are still showing that the boats furthest back are making the bigger gains on us, which really only proves how fast we are sailing out of this front. Fortunately, we have managed to keep the angry kitty (Puma) at bay and still hold a small buffer zone of 30+ miles. </p> <p> The fire in team morale still burns strong. Jules and Ian have been non-stop with performance analysis and weather updates. Since we are being chased by what feels like a pack of dogs (and one cat), the general theme has been to sail the fastest angle possible. So the boys have been really pushing Azzam for the 36 hours. Hopefully it will have been enough to give us an advantage when we hit the ridge off Portugal. </p> <img border="0" src="http://www.volvooceanraceabudhabi.com/blog/content/binary/0~0~0~ad~volvo_race_office~0~0~vor300512_dana_28722.jpg"><img width="0" height="0" src="http://www.volvooceanraceabudhabi.com/blog/aggbug.ashx?id=7ab54da2-55fd-429c-9114-43503a060645" /> http://www.volvooceanraceabudhabi.com/blog/CommentView,guid,7ab54da2-55fd-429c-9114-43503a060645.aspx
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As predicted our lead is rapidly vanishing before our eyes. The fact that we knew this would happen means we are all calm about it and remain fully focused on what lies ahead. It is business as usual onboard and we have learnt not to let large losses at every position report affect our mood. There is quite simply nothing we can do about it if the boats behind bring 3 or more knots more wind up into the back of you. Sooner or later they will get close enough to be in more similar wind and then we have to hope we can compete. By then I suspect the wind will be very light and it could be anyone’s game.

One good thing is the sailing conditions are very easy indeed. Fast angles, smooth seas and not too many sail changes. We are approaching 1000 miles to go and our plan is to rest people up while the going is easy so that we have fully charged batteries for what will certainly be a frantic last 36 hours. If that means everyone on deck then so be it – there will be time to rest in Lisbon. If anybody in Miami had offered us a 1 mile lead with 1000 miles to go we would have gladly taken it. We may have lost 60 miles in 24 hours to the chasing pack today but we remain closest to Lisbon and we hope to be for some time yet.

Team Blog – Ian Walker – 29th May 2012 http://www.volvooceanraceabudhabi.com/blog/PermaLink,guid,13ad956e-bab5-4cf6-a0a6-7cdd0a14c467.aspx http://www.volvooceanraceabudhabi.com/blog/2012/05/29/TeamBlogIanWalker29thMay2012.aspx Tue, 29 May 2012 07:59:47 GMT <p> As predicted our lead is rapidly vanishing before our eyes. The fact that we knew this would happen means we are all calm about it and remain fully focused on what lies ahead. It is business as usual onboard and we have learnt not to let large losses at every position report affect our mood. There is quite simply nothing we can do about it if the boats behind bring 3 or more knots more wind up into the back of you. Sooner or later they will get close enough to be in more similar wind and then we have to hope we can compete. By then I suspect the wind will be very light and it could be anyone’s game. </p> <p> One good thing is the sailing conditions are very easy indeed. Fast angles, smooth seas and not too many sail changes. We are approaching 1000 miles to go and our plan is to rest people up while the going is easy so that we have fully charged batteries for what will certainly be a frantic last 36 hours. If that means everyone on deck then so be it – there will be time to rest in Lisbon. If anybody in Miami had offered us a 1 mile lead with 1000 miles to go we would have gladly taken it. We may have lost 60 miles in 24 hours to the chasing pack today but we remain closest to Lisbon and we hope to be for some time yet. </p> <img border="0" src="http://www.volvooceanraceabudhabi.com/blog/content/binary/0~0~0~ad~volvo_race_office~0~0~vor260512_dana_27334.jpg"><img width="0" height="0" src="http://www.volvooceanraceabudhabi.com/blog/aggbug.ashx?id=13ad956e-bab5-4cf6-a0a6-7cdd0a14c467" /> http://www.volvooceanraceabudhabi.com/blog/CommentView,guid,13ad956e-bab5-4cf6-a0a6-7cdd0a14c467.aspx
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As the fleet charges east at ever increasing speeds towards Lisbon we know that it is highly likely that we may have to give up a lot of our 90 mile lead to the chasing pack. I am not being defeatist, just preparing myself mentally for the fact that those behind will have more wind than us due to the advancing cold front picking everyone up from behind. More windspeed equals more boatspeed at these wind angles so the guys behind will certainly gain.

The big question is at what rate will they gain and do we have enough of a lead to hang on for two days until we enter the light air band 300 miles from Lisbon. All we can do is sail as fast as possible and hope that the wind field evens up as the boats get closer together. We need to try and minimize our losses as best we can and position ourselves well for the final section of the race. One thing for certain is that there is going to be a very tight finish from first to last place in Lisbon. The weather gods have scripted that.

So far we have sailed a very good leg and everyone onboard is fiercely determined to defend our lead for as long we possibly can.

Team Blog – Ian Walker – 28th May 2012 http://www.volvooceanraceabudhabi.com/blog/PermaLink,guid,b277f6fc-1f28-4ed0-a23d-c2509e550681.aspx http://www.volvooceanraceabudhabi.com/blog/2012/05/28/TeamBlogIanWalker28thMay2012.aspx Mon, 28 May 2012 11:29:09 GMT <p> As the fleet charges east at ever increasing speeds towards Lisbon we know that it is highly likely that we may have to give up a lot of our 90 mile lead to the chasing pack. I am not being defeatist, just preparing myself mentally for the fact that those behind will have more wind than us due to the advancing cold front picking everyone up from behind. More windspeed equals more boatspeed at these wind angles so the guys behind will certainly gain. </p> <p> The big question is at what rate will they gain and do we have enough of a lead to hang on for two days until we enter the light air band 300 miles from Lisbon. All we can do is sail as fast as possible and hope that the wind field evens up as the boats get closer together. We need to try and minimize our losses as best we can and position ourselves well for the final section of the race. One thing for certain is that there is going to be a very tight finish from first to last place in Lisbon. The weather gods have scripted that. </p> <p> So far we have sailed a very good leg and everyone onboard is fiercely determined to defend our lead for as long we possibly can. </p> <img border="0" src="http://www.volvooceanraceabudhabi.com/blog/content/binary/0~0~0~ad~volvo_race_office~0~0~vor280512_dana_27664.jpg"><img width="0" height="0" src="http://www.volvooceanraceabudhabi.com/blog/aggbug.ashx?id=b277f6fc-1f28-4ed0-a23d-c2509e550681" /> http://www.volvooceanraceabudhabi.com/blog/CommentView,guid,b277f6fc-1f28-4ed0-a23d-c2509e550681.aspx
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It’s been a great 24 hours for Azzam. A big dilemma between sailing for the predicted right hand shift and going left to get in the Gulf Stream created a big split in the fleet and lots of opportunity. This is exactly what we need as we can get away from the other boats and try to find something tactically. Jules did a nice job as we initially tried to play the current but on finding it wasn’t as forecasted we decided to take the shift instead.

Camper and ourselves went East and made nice gains which we managed to cash in by tacking north and getting the last of the current. Anyway that is all history as we now have to escape round the bottom of the advancing high pressure in order to get into building and lifting winds to the east. This should be an ideal scenario for the lead boats to stretch ahead but right now as we sit wallowing in 4 knots of wind it doesn’t feel that way! A couple of things are certain however. Firstly we have exceeded our intention of containing our losses in the last upwind section we should have in the leg and secondly it feels good to be in the lead and pointing towards Lisbon with less than 2000 miles to go.

There is a lot of racing left including the hole we currently sit in and a huge park up likely before the finish but it is important to enjoy the good times while you can.

Team Blog – Ian Walker – 26th May 2012 http://www.volvooceanraceabudhabi.com/blog/PermaLink,guid,620e1139-94bc-432c-ac5d-d6a7d3c3b276.aspx http://www.volvooceanraceabudhabi.com/blog/2012/05/26/TeamBlogIanWalker26thMay2012.aspx Sat, 26 May 2012 13:46:54 GMT <p> It’s been a great 24 hours for Azzam. A big dilemma between sailing for the predicted right hand shift and going left to get in the Gulf Stream created a big split in the fleet and lots of opportunity. This is exactly what we need as we can get away from the other boats and try to find something tactically. Jules did a nice job as we initially tried to play the current but on finding it wasn’t as forecasted we decided to take the shift instead. </p> <p> Camper and ourselves went East and made nice gains which we managed to cash in by tacking north and getting the last of the current. Anyway that is all history as we now have to escape round the bottom of the advancing high pressure in order to get into building and lifting winds to the east. This should be an ideal scenario for the lead boats to stretch ahead but right now as we sit wallowing in 4 knots of wind it doesn’t feel that way! A couple of things are certain however. Firstly we have exceeded our intention of containing our losses in the last upwind section we should have in the leg and secondly it feels good to be in the lead and pointing towards Lisbon with less than 2000 miles to go. </p> <p> There is a lot of racing left including the hole we currently sit in and a huge park up likely before the finish but it is important to enjoy the good times while you can. </p> <img border="0" src="http://www.volvooceanraceabudhabi.com/blog/content/binary/0~0~0~ad~volvo_race_office~0~0~vor260512_dana_27293 FB.jpg"><img width="0" height="0" src="http://www.volvooceanraceabudhabi.com/blog/aggbug.ashx?id=620e1139-94bc-432c-ac5d-d6a7d3c3b276" /> http://www.volvooceanraceabudhabi.com/blog/CommentView,guid,620e1139-94bc-432c-ac5d-d6a7d3c3b276.aspx
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There haven’t been that many occasions in this race when we have been able to look forward to the three hourly position reports but the last 12 hours has been an exception. The light air reaching has been a condition where we seem to be able to hold our own against our rivals and our move to the north has paid handsome dividends.

To be fair to Telefonica and Groupama - who look like they will be the biggest losers in the short term - it was a classic case of the fleet turning inside out. The leaders further east could still potentially connect with westerly winds around the Azores High, whilst those further back had little chance to do so and the northerly option was far more open. As things evolved everyone had to turn north and those behind that went first gained the most.

So right now we are in a good race with Camper and Puma for the lead, although as the wind has gone forward of the beam so their performance has increased relative to ours. They are breathing down our necks – one pulling bearing to leeward and one climbing up behind us. The next day will be tough for us upwind but with the Gulf Stream to play and some big shifts approaching positioning could be crucial. Somehow we need to hang in for the next 24 hours when conditions will once again open up and the fast downwind sail towards Lisbon will begin.

Life changes very little onboard Azzam whether we are in first or last. The routines stay the same as does the work rate but I can honestly say it is much more fun being in the lead this morning – long may it last!

Team Blog – Ian Walker – 25th May 2012 http://www.volvooceanraceabudhabi.com/blog/PermaLink,guid,1bce7f42-1b80-4845-bfb7-1fc79236dbe7.aspx http://www.volvooceanraceabudhabi.com/blog/2012/05/25/TeamBlogIanWalker25thMay2012.aspx Fri, 25 May 2012 11:12:30 GMT <p> There haven’t been that many occasions in this race when we have been able to look forward to the three hourly position reports but the last 12 hours has been an exception. The light air reaching has been a condition where we seem to be able to hold our own against our rivals and our move to the north has paid handsome dividends. </p> <p> To be fair to Telefonica and Groupama - who look like they will be the biggest losers in the short term - it was a classic case of the fleet turning inside out. The leaders further east could still potentially connect with westerly winds around the Azores High, whilst those further back had little chance to do so and the northerly option was far more open. As things evolved everyone had to turn north and those behind that went first gained the most. </p> <p> So right now we are in a good race with Camper and Puma for the lead, although as the wind has gone forward of the beam so their performance has increased relative to ours. They are breathing down our necks – one pulling bearing to leeward and one climbing up behind us. The next day will be tough for us upwind but with the Gulf Stream to play and some big shifts approaching positioning could be crucial. Somehow we need to hang in for the next 24 hours when conditions will once again open up and the fast downwind sail towards Lisbon will begin. </p> <p> Life changes very little onboard Azzam whether we are in first or last. The routines stay the same as does the work rate but I can honestly say it is much more fun being in the lead this morning – long may it last! </p> <img border="0" src="http://www.volvooceanraceabudhabi.com/blog/content/binary/0~0~0~ad~volvo_race_office~0~0~vor240512_dana_26708.jpg"><img width="0" height="0" src="http://www.volvooceanraceabudhabi.com/blog/aggbug.ashx?id=1bce7f42-1b80-4845-bfb7-1fc79236dbe7" /> http://www.volvooceanraceabudhabi.com/blog/CommentView,guid,1bce7f42-1b80-4845-bfb7-1fc79236dbe7.aspx
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It has been a very good 36 hours for the team on Azzam. Our move to the north paid good dividends and for a while we were in sight of Telefonica and took third place in the standings from Puma. Sadly Telefonica have again demonstrated their pace to us by sailing away from four miles in front of us to 22 miles in the last 24 hours. Once again we will have to be patient and hope that an opening happens later in the leg for us to get back at them.

The fleet remains closely packed and is now almost lined up north – south as we push our way east about 100 miles north of Bermuda. The weather still looks quite complicated but in general it sees us sailing due east at least into mid – Atlantic. You will hear no complaints about this by those onboard. Due east means a more direct, shorter route and it also means a far warmer route than the more common paths up past the ice gates in the north.

Right now it is daybreak and we have beautiful sailing conditions. We are spinnaker running in 16 knots of wind and a fairly tame sea state. All is well onboard and everybody has rested up after the exertions of Alberta. It looks like a day or two of drag racing before the weather throws the next curve ball our way.

Team Blog – Ian Walker – 23rd May 2012 http://www.volvooceanraceabudhabi.com/blog/PermaLink,guid,42af3965-2e74-4c95-a2a5-21af2d81cd28.aspx http://www.volvooceanraceabudhabi.com/blog/2012/05/23/TeamBlogIanWalker23rdMay2012.aspx Wed, 23 May 2012 11:14:13 GMT <p> It has been a very good 36 hours for the team on Azzam. Our move to the north paid good dividends and for a while we were in sight of Telefonica and took third place in the standings from Puma. Sadly Telefonica have again demonstrated their pace to us by sailing away from four miles in front of us to 22 miles in the last 24 hours. Once again we will have to be patient and hope that an opening happens later in the leg for us to get back at them. </p> <p> The fleet remains closely packed and is now almost lined up north – south as we push our way east about 100 miles north of Bermuda. The weather still looks quite complicated but in general it sees us sailing due east at least into mid – Atlantic. You will hear no complaints about this by those onboard. Due east means a more direct, shorter route and it also means a far warmer route than the more common paths up past the ice gates in the north. </p> <p> Right now it is daybreak and we have beautiful sailing conditions. We are spinnaker running in 16 knots of wind and a fairly tame sea state. All is well onboard and everybody has rested up after the exertions of Alberta. It looks like a day or two of drag racing before the weather throws the next curve ball our way. </p> <img border="0" src="http://www.volvooceanraceabudhabi.com/blog/content/binary/0~0~0~ad~volvo_race_office~0~0~vor220512_dana_25866.jpg"><img width="0" height="0" src="http://www.volvooceanraceabudhabi.com/blog/aggbug.ashx?id=42af3965-2e74-4c95-a2a5-21af2d81cd28" /> http://www.volvooceanraceabudhabi.com/blog/CommentView,guid,42af3965-2e74-4c95-a2a5-21af2d81cd28.aspx
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What a day! The whole fleet, with the exception of Groupama, was caught out when the tropical depression Alberta changed course and moved south east over the top of us. We were trying to ride the windshift and extra wind just to the south of it but a violent windshift headed us straight into the eye of the storm. There then followed a chaotic 12 hour period as we ended up on the wrong side of it beating upwind in 35 knots. All of a sudden instead of a fast ride east to the storm’s south we were right in it and in survival mode with three reefs and a heavy weather jib. We came off some terrible waves but most worrying of all was the lightning.

The lightning was crashing all around right down to the water and it didn’t seem possible our carbon mast could avoid a direct strike. Nevertheless we escaped as we managed to sail back on ourselves to the favoured side and eventually again get on our way. Groupama outsmarted everyone by gybing earlier and staying away from Alberta and cashed in a 70 mile lead. Thankfully things have settled down now and after an entire day of seemingly non-stop sail changes we are now enjoying smoother water and steadier winds.

Everyone is tired as it has needed pretty much all hands on deck all day long. To make things worse we have a couple of bad backs onboard that are suffering and one of us took a fairly hard blow to the head when he got washed back off the foredeck. Right now the priority is to get some food and drink into everyone, get people rested and continue the gains we have made in the last few hours. What was billed as a nice easy Atlantic crossing on initial forecasts has so far turned out to be anything but!

Team Blog – Ian Walker – 22nd May 2012 http://www.volvooceanraceabudhabi.com/blog/PermaLink,guid,1fe30b5f-79a2-473f-90b8-99fadb1a1631.aspx http://www.volvooceanraceabudhabi.com/blog/2012/05/22/TeamBlogIanWalker22ndMay2012.aspx Tue, 22 May 2012 05:31:34 GMT <p> What a day! The whole fleet, with the exception of Groupama, was caught out when the tropical depression Alberta changed course and moved south east over the top of us. We were trying to ride the windshift and extra wind just to the south of it but a violent windshift headed us straight into the eye of the storm. There then followed a chaotic 12 hour period as we ended up on the wrong side of it beating upwind in 35 knots. All of a sudden instead of a fast ride east to the storm’s south we were right in it and in survival mode with three reefs and a heavy weather jib. We came off some terrible waves but most worrying of all was the lightning. </p> <p> The lightning was crashing all around right down to the water and it didn’t seem possible our carbon mast could avoid a direct strike. Nevertheless we escaped as we managed to sail back on ourselves to the favoured side and eventually again get on our way. Groupama outsmarted everyone by gybing earlier and staying away from Alberta and cashed in a 70 mile lead. Thankfully things have settled down now and after an entire day of seemingly non-stop sail changes we are now enjoying smoother water and steadier winds. </p> <p> Everyone is tired as it has needed pretty much all hands on deck all day long. To make things worse we have a couple of bad backs onboard that are suffering and one of us took a fairly hard blow to the head when he got washed back off the foredeck. Right now the priority is to get some food and drink into everyone, get people rested and continue the gains we have made in the last few hours. What was billed as a nice easy Atlantic crossing on initial forecasts has so far turned out to be anything but! </p> <img border="0" src="http://www.volvooceanraceabudhabi.com/blog/content/binary/0~0~0~ad~volvo_race_office~0~0~vor210512_dana_25166.jpg"><img width="0" height="0" src="http://www.volvooceanraceabudhabi.com/blog/aggbug.ashx?id=1fe30b5f-79a2-473f-90b8-99fadb1a1631" /> http://www.volvooceanraceabudhabi.com/blog/CommentView,guid,1fe30b5f-79a2-473f-90b8-99fadb1a1631.aspx
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Our good Miami form continued with a fairly clinical restart. It was light, shifty and with a lot of current but we made the best of it with a nice start and an aggressive move out towards the Gulf Stream. Unfortunately we got a big plastic bag wrapped on the keel on the 2nd lap which slowed us and almost enabled Groupama to pass us returning to the gate. In the end Craig dived over the side as we tacked to clean the keel and we were on our way at full speed again.

As we head north with 4 knots of Gulf Stream current underneath us it is starting to get bumpy. The faster boats have already ground us down and passed us and just like before it seems that Telefonica is the most potent of them all upwind. We are expecting a light air transition into westerly winds soon which will hopefully mean the start of a long period of downwind sailing. At the moment the forecast looks good with a very direct route that shouldn’t challenge the ice gates in the north too much.

As always things can change quickly in the North Atlantic and with Tropical Storm Alberta not far north of us we will remain on our guard. Now it is time to settle into our first night at sea and once again try to find Azzam’s rhythm.

Team Blog – Ian Walker – 21st May 2012 http://www.volvooceanraceabudhabi.com/blog/PermaLink,guid,d9cf000a-d593-46e8-ae7a-74d75d5bd438.aspx http://www.volvooceanraceabudhabi.com/blog/2012/05/21/TeamBlogIanWalker21stMay2012.aspx Mon, 21 May 2012 07:40:34 GMT <p> Our good Miami form continued with a fairly clinical restart. It was light, shifty and with a lot of current but we made the best of it with a nice start and an aggressive move out towards the Gulf Stream. Unfortunately we got a big plastic bag wrapped on the keel on the 2nd lap which slowed us and almost enabled Groupama to pass us returning to the gate. In the end Craig dived over the side as we tacked to clean the keel and we were on our way at full speed again. </p> <p> As we head north with 4 knots of Gulf Stream current underneath us it is starting to get bumpy. The faster boats have already ground us down and passed us and just like before it seems that Telefonica is the most potent of them all upwind. We are expecting a light air transition into westerly winds soon which will hopefully mean the start of a long period of downwind sailing. At the moment the forecast looks good with a very direct route that shouldn’t challenge the ice gates in the north too much. </p> <p> As always things can change quickly in the North Atlantic and with Tropical Storm Alberta not far north of us we will remain on our guard. Now it is time to settle into our first night at sea and once again try to find Azzam’s rhythm. </p> <img border="0" src="http://www.volvooceanraceabudhabi.com/blog/content/binary/AS_20120517-0877.jpg"><img width="0" height="0" src="http://www.volvooceanraceabudhabi.com/blog/aggbug.ashx?id=d9cf000a-d593-46e8-ae7a-74d75d5bd438" /> http://www.volvooceanraceabudhabi.com/blog/CommentView,guid,d9cf000a-d593-46e8-ae7a-74d75d5bd438.aspx
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What a fantastic result yesterday in the Miami In-Port Race. It was a crazy race but thanks to some good calls by Jules and some special crew work by the lads we managed to come out on top. This meant so much to me because it showed how strong the team remains and how determined we are to keep doing our best in this race. Our two days of training really paid off. Whilst it is one thing to do well inshore our real goal is to get on the podium offshore. Today is another day and now it is time to concentrate on leg 7 to Lisbon.

The weather look pretty strange for the first few days and then the downwind ride to Lisbon should kick in. Personally I can’t wait for the race to return to Europe and especially to the waters where we carried out all our pre race training. Miami remains a lucky venue for me and Abu Dhabi Ocean racing can leave with smiles on their faces.

Team Blog – Ian Walker – 20th May 2012 http://www.volvooceanraceabudhabi.com/blog/PermaLink,guid,cfffef3d-2a2f-42c9-b5c2-197020ba7551.aspx http://www.volvooceanraceabudhabi.com/blog/2012/05/20/TeamBlogIanWalker20thMay2012.aspx Sun, 20 May 2012 15:56:12 GMT <p> What a fantastic result yesterday in the Miami In-Port Race. It was a crazy race but thanks to some good calls by Jules and some special crew work by the lads we managed to come out on top. This meant so much to me because it showed how strong the team remains and how determined we are to keep doing our best in this race. Our two days of training really paid off. Whilst it is one thing to do well inshore our real goal is to get on the podium offshore. Today is another day and now it is time to concentrate on leg 7 to Lisbon. </p> <p> The weather look pretty strange for the first few days and then the downwind ride to Lisbon should kick in. Personally I can’t wait for the race to return to Europe and especially to the waters where we carried out all our pre race training. Miami remains a lucky venue for me and Abu Dhabi Ocean racing can leave with smiles on their faces. </p> <img border="0" src="http://www.volvooceanraceabudhabi.com/blog/content/binary/AS_20120517-0946.jpg"><img width="0" height="0" src="http://www.volvooceanraceabudhabi.com/blog/aggbug.ashx?id=cfffef3d-2a2f-42c9-b5c2-197020ba7551" /> http://www.volvooceanraceabudhabi.com/blog/CommentView,guid,cfffef3d-2a2f-42c9-b5c2-197020ba7551.aspx
http://www.volvooceanraceabudhabi.com/blog/Trackback.aspx?guid=532cbb6f-c88e-43fe-b8dc-6591f1fea23f http://www.volvooceanraceabudhabi.com/blog/pingback.aspx http://www.volvooceanraceabudhabi.com/blog/PermaLink,guid,532cbb6f-c88e-43fe-b8dc-6591f1fea23f.aspx ADOR http://www.volvooceanraceabudhabi.com/blog/CommentView,guid,532cbb6f-c88e-43fe-b8dc-6591f1fea23f.aspx http://www.volvooceanraceabudhabi.com/blog/SyndicationService.asmx/GetEntryCommentsRss?guid=532cbb6f-c88e-43fe-b8dc-6591f1fea23f Team Blog – Nick Dana– 10th May 2012 http://www.volvooceanraceabudhabi.com/blog/PermaLink,guid,532cbb6f-c88e-43fe-b8dc-6591f1fea23f.aspx http://www.volvooceanraceabudhabi.com/blog/2012/05/10/TeamBlogNickDana10thMay2012.aspx Thu, 10 May 2012 07:06:15 GMT <p> Just under 30 miles left in the leg for us aboard Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing’s Azzam. Minutes ago we tacked several hundred metres off Fort Lauderdale beach and are now heading south to the finish in Miami. The entire crew is awake and staring at the glow of civilization. Some are hungry and continue to eat freeze dried, while others have different food on their mind already and are holding out. </p> <p> We managed a pretty easy Gulf Stream crossing. Considering we were beating across the massive current stream, 30 miles north is not too bad. “The breeze has died down considerable since we reached the other side. The moon is out and we are having a nice sail down the coast to Miami. Very happy to be in America” explains Wade Morgan. As of right now, the router has us finishing in roughly two hours – about an hour before sunrise local time. “I haven’t been back here for a while, but I do very much enjoy Miami and look forward to spending a nice week off here” says Rob Greenhalgh. </p> <p> Some of the crew will be staying put in Miami, while others will return home to see their families. We are all back at work on Tuesday and will be determined to change our luck in the next leg across the Atlantic. Until then, we will all enjoy some nice R & R in the land of the free. </p> <img border="0" src="http://www.volvooceanraceabudhabi.com/blog/content/binary/0~0~0~ad~volvo_race_office~0~0~vor100512_dana_24925 blog.jpg"><img width="0" height="0" src="http://www.volvooceanraceabudhabi.com/blog/aggbug.ashx?id=532cbb6f-c88e-43fe-b8dc-6591f1fea23f" /> http://www.volvooceanraceabudhabi.com/blog/CommentView,guid,532cbb6f-c88e-43fe-b8dc-6591f1fea23f.aspx